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A sailor left clinging to an old fishermen’s boat, after seeing in terror his ship in the dark without him, spent almost 24 hours bobbing on the Pacific Ocean.

On February 16, Chief Engineer Vidam Perevertilov toppled the Silver Supporter’s deck at around 4 am, without a lifejacket, as the vessel regularly supplied Tauranga to Pitcairn Island.

After finishing his night shift in the engine room, Perevetilov then told his son, he felt dizzy and went to the back of deck to get himself back and drink only.

“He doesn’t remember falling overboard. He may have fainted,” Perevetilov’s son Marat told Stuff.

Perevetilov regained knowledge as he sailed into the dark pitch to see the Silver Supporteur.

Six hours took the crew of the ship to see that he lacked.

The team confirmed that Perevetilov was on-board at 4 a.m. when an alarm was declared and a distress was radioed by the Joint Emergency Coordination Centre in Tahiti because he filed a report log at 4 p.m.

French aircraft supported the Polynesian quest, while France’s national weather services helped calculate possible patterns of drift.

In the meantime, an exhausted Perevetilov fought to stay a hard night.

He spotted a black speck on the horizon with the morning light and swam to it.

Perevetilov regained knowledge as he sailed into the dark pitch to see the Silver Supporteur.

Six hours took the crew of the ship to see that he lacked.

The team confirmed that Perevetilov was on-board at 4 a.m. when an alarm was declared and a distress was radioed by the Joint Emergency Coordination Centre in Tahiti because he filed a report log at 4 p.m.

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French aircraft supported the Polynesian quest, while France’s national weather services helped calculate possible patterns of drift.

In the meantime, an exhausted Perevetilov fought to stay a hard night.

He spotted a black speck on the horizon with the morning light and swam to it.

Marat said Things, “It turned out to be an old fishing buoy,”
“It was just a piece of sea rubbish.”

But it swam and Perevetilov could hold to it and survive.

His hopes for salvation were answered as he was bobbling in the sea.

About 17 hours after it had overthrown deck, the Silver supporter found Perevetilov.

The search pattern was set when a passer-by on the boat heard a distant voice on the boat deck, and he was pulled tired but alive aboard.

British New Zealand High Commissioner Laura Clarke has said that the Herald “hugely relieved” when she learned of the rescue, and she also serves as Governor of the Pitcairn Islands.

“We all feared for the worst, given the sheer scale of the Pacific Ocean, and its strong currents,” she said.

“So the fact that the Silver Supporter found him, and he survived is just amazing: a story of survival that even Captain Bligh … would have applauded.”

Vice Admiral William Bligh, who was thrown at sea as Captain of the Bounty by mutineers in 1789, sailed 6700 kilometers in an open voyage.

The first settlers of Pitcairn Island were later replaced by the mutinous crew.

Perevetilov’s son, Marat, told Stuff that he had been shocked by the fact that his father hadn’t taken a fishing boot to his life as a souvenir, aboard.

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“It’s funny. He said he wanted to leave it there, so it could save another person’s life,” he said.

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