Contact Information

Oak Avenue, Manhattan Beach, California 90266

Contact Us

The number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the United States has increased for the fourth week in a row, according to White House officials, although the number of deaths has decreased.

According to Rochelle Walensky, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are now on average 64,000 new coronavirus cases every day, up 7% from the previous week. She said that death rates have been declining, with an average of 800 deaths per day.

According to Walensky, the increased number of cases is mainly affecting younger adults as governments, industries, and schools increasingly reopen. And it’s thought that highly infectious variants are to blame, at least in part.

IMAGE SOURCE: ALJAZEERA

“As the trends and data have been indicating, cases are increasing nationally and we are seeing this occur predominantly in younger adults,” Walensky said during a COVID-19 task force news conference.

“We know that these increases are due in part to more highly transmissible variants which we are closely monitoring,” she said.

Despite the spike in cases and hospitalizations, officials said the country has been making steady progress in its attempts to vaccinate Americans. More than 165 million doses have been sent out so far, according to the CDC.

Andy Slavitt, a COVID-19 advisor at the White House, said the US is currently distributing 3.1 million doses every day on average. And almost one-third of adults have had at least one vaccine. He claims that 55 percent of seniors aged 65 and up are completely vaccinated, with 75 percent receiving at least one dose.

READ:  Three Female Journalists were Killed in Eastern Afghanistan

“We’re headed in the right direction,” Slavitt said during the news briefing. “But we’re not there yet,” he warned.

“The war against COVID-19 is far from over, far from won,” Slavitt said. “The worst thing we can do right now would be to mistake progress for victory.”

IMAGE SOURCE: ALJAZEERA

Many states have made steady strides in their vaccination programs, and a number of them have recently extended their eligibility standards to include anyone over the age of 16. Front-line staff and others with ongoing health problems are not being vaccinated in other nations.

Three vaccines have received emergency approval in the United States: Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson. The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine may also be approved in the United States, boosting the country’s supply. By the second half of 2021, the United States is projected to have a vaccine surplus.

President Joe Biden of the United States, who took office in January, has set a deadline for all states to provide vaccines to anyone who requests them by May. He also designated July 4, the United States’ Independence Day, as the date when Americans should be able to resume some semblance of normalcy.

According to a tally by Johns Hopkins University, the coronavirus has killed over 555,000 Americans, more than any other nation on the planet.

Source: ALJAZEERA

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments